110 years ago – Remains of civil war soldiers in Shohola will be reburied in Elmira | Local history

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June 24, 1911

The remains of the soldiers must be reburied

It was a solemn day in Shohola as work began to transfer the remains of Union and Confederate soldiers from their anonymous graves on Sill Farm to Woodlawn National Cemetery in Elmira, New York.

A law recently passed by Congress provided for the relocation and relocation of all unidentified Union and Confederation soldiers to national cemeteries.

Seventy-two Confederate and Union soldiers were laid to rest in the farm field on July 15, 1864, following a horrific train crash at King and Fuller Cut. Mechanics, firefighters and the train brakeman were also killed in the crash.

The Erie Railroad train carried more than 800 Confederate POWs from Point Lookout, Maryland, to a Union POW camp in Elmira, New York.

The train jumped off the rails and plunged into an embankment. The remains of the soldiers killed were so badly damaged in the crash that they could not be unidentified.

Captain Fenton of the United States Second Cavalry oversaw the transfer with Undertaker CI Terwilliger and Sons of Port Jervis doing the solemn work.

While carrying out the removal of the remains, the funeral directors found personal items of the soldiers, such as daguerreotypes, knives, pipes and uniform ornaments. Fenton said the items will be collected and placed in the National Museum’s collection.

Quinlan a Sensation Thomas “Finners” Quinlan of Scranton has given Ohio and Pennsylvania League teams and fans something to talk about.

Quinlan, a Steubenville Stubs member with a 0.390 batting average, helped his team win against Akron on June 21. With his stick, he brought his teammates Graf and Castle home several times during the game.

Quinlan started playing baseball in 1908 when he played for Owen McKenna’s St. John’s team in the Temperance League.

Henry Jones’ big day Henry Jones, 8 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Jones of Hampton Street, had a big day on his own.

Young Henry went alone to Moosic Lake on June 23.

After a day spent enjoying all the activities at the lake, it was time to come home. Henry discovered that he had no more money for the return trip on the streetcar. The driver refused him passage with payment.

Henri began to cry. An attendant placed him on the streetcar for the return trip to Scranton. Once in town, the Scranton Police took care of the child.

Brian fulton, Library Director, oversees the Times-Tribune’s extensive digital and print archives and is an authority on local history. Contact Brian at [email protected] or 570-348-9140.

Brian Fulton, Library Director, oversees the Times-Tribune’s extensive digital and print archives and is an authority on local history. Contact Brian at [email protected] or 570-348-9140.


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